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Texas Plains Trail Region

Participant in the Texas Historical Commission's
Texas Heritage Trails Program

Paducah


Gober-Barron-Williford House, c. 1896, Paducah
Gober-Barron-Williford House, c. 1896, Paducah

Paducah, the seat of Cottle County, is sometimes referred to as the "Crossroads of America" because U.S. highways 70 and 83, which run from the borders of the United States, intersect there. Two hours or less driving time from Amarillo, Lubbock, Wichita Falls, or Abilene in the rugged ranch country, this historic city, as locals say with a smile, is situated "in the middle of nowhere, but in the heart of everything."

R. Potts, an early settler in the region, moved here from Paducah, Kentucky, in the mid-1800s and offered later arrivals free land in return for their votes to name the new settlement Paducah and to make it the county seat. Every April, Paducah hosts an Old Settlers' Reunion and Rodeo. The Matador Wildlife Management Area eight miles north of Paducah offers many public-use opportunities, such as hunting, fishing, hiking, bird watching, camping, horseback riding, nature study, and photography.

Just off the courthouse square, the Paducah Visitor Information Center occupies the town's restored two-story jail building; a Quanah Parker Trail giant arrow marker is situated on the grounds.

Paducah's City County Heritage Museum is housed in the former Quanah, Acme & Pacific Railroad depot north of town.


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